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Headlines Tagged with Genes 1,367 headlines found

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Y men are more likely to get cancer than women

Aside from the well-known dramatic increase it causes in the risk of lung cancer, smoking has now been found to obliterate a chromosome in blood cells that could offer vital protection against cancer growth elsewhere in the body.
New Scientist
added Dec 5, 2014 10:55
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Scientists find why male smokers may run even higher health risks

Male smokers are three times more likely than non-smoking men to lose their Y chromosomes, according to research which may explain why men develop and die from many cancers at disproportionate rates compared to women.
Reuters
added Dec 5, 2014 10:54
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Smoking Might Cost Men Their 'Y' Chromosome, Study Finds

Consequences aren't clear, but experts suspect the change might be linked to increased cancer risk
HealthDay [HealthScout]
added Dec 4, 2014 21:21
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Why Smoking Causes Cancer In More Men Than Women

Men who smoke may be at greater risk for lung cancer than their female counterparts, according to a new study in the journal Science. That might be because smoking reduces the number of Y chromosomes in blood cells. Previous research has shown that when
TIME Magazine
added Dec 4, 2014 21:18
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Researchers find why smoking riskier for men than women

- Men who smoke are over three times more likely than nonsmokers to lose their Y chromosomes, according to researchers who have previously shown that loss of the Y chromosome is linked to cancer.
Xinhua Newswire
added Dec 4, 2014 21:10
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Male Smokers Run Risk of Losing Their Y Chromosomes

Cigarettes make you look sexy, right? Wrong. It turns out that smoking tobacco can cause men to lose their Y chromosomes, which could mean lower sperm counts.
Healthline Networks
added Dec 4, 2014 20:53
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Men: the more you smoke, the more Y chromosomes you lose

men who smoke experience a higher number of cell mutations, which have been proven to lead to the loss of Y chromosomes, in their blood cells than men who don’t. This preliminary finding is alarming because the same group of researchers previously linked
The Verge (Vox Media)
added Dec 4, 2014 20:51
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Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of
News-Medical.net
added Dec 4, 2014 20:26
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[Louisiana] Lung cancer not just a ‘smoker’s disease’

Local family promotes lung cancer awareness after non-smoking son diagnosed with stage four cancer... The two federal agencies providing most of the research money fund breast cancer research at a rate of $26,398 per death while spending $1,442 per lung
Monroe (LA) News-Star
added Dec 4, 2014 20:11
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[Australia] Study finds smoking gun for oesophageal cancer

Queensland researchers have found that sudden “chromosomal catastrophes” may trigger a third of oesophageal tumours, the fastest rising cancer in Australia. Dr Nic Waddell, who led the study with Professor Sean Grimmond at The University of Queensland’s
HealthCanal.com
added Nov 2, 2014 10:09
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